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Property Council joins the call to dump SA bank tax

26 September 2017

Australian Bankers’ Association Chief Executive Anna Bligh today welcomed the South Australian Property Council’s call for the South Australian bank tax to be dumped.

In a report on the South Australian economy released today, the Property Council described the bank tax as ‘bad economic policy that applies a handbrake on investment and jobs’.

“This is another example of a major South Australian business group calling for this tax to be dumped before it does damage to the state,” Ms Bligh said.

“South Australia needs incentives to attract business, not new taxes that will discourage businesses from investing in new projects and employing people.

“The ABA calls on the South Australian Government to heed the warnings of businesses and the people of South Australia and dump the tax,” she said.

The South Australian Upper House is set to determine the fate of the tax in a vote within weeks.

The Property Council comments on the SA bank tax can be found here.

ENDS

Contact: Stephanie Arena 0477 470 677

@austbankers

bankers.asn.au

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